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Gallipoli Art Prize 2017
The Soldier Quilt
ANZAC DAY 2015
Rochester Show 2015 backs Centenary WWI
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CENTENARY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR, 1914 - 1918

Australian soldiers

Gallipoli Art Prize 2017

All the information needed to apply for entry
 to the GALLIPOLI ART PRIZE 
can be found on this web page


See past winners

Download the application form

The competition is run in both Australia and Turkey


There is also an interesting illustrated article by Lucy Stranger (which relates to 2015)
in an issue of Artist Profile magazine.

Worth checking out too!


Artists present a diverse range of images - what would you depict?












The Soldier Quilt

Dear Neville,

I am very pleased with the framing of my quilt.

We have hung same and are thrilled with its effect. You wanted to know a little about the subject.

‘Harry’ Moore, as I know him, was a close friend of my grandmother’s family in North Melbourne. There was a possibility he was romantically involved with either my grandmother or my grandaunt.

Harry was killed at Ploegsreet in 1916.

There is a photograph of this area the day before he was killed showing a very pleasant, heavily wooded scene untouched by the war.  He was laying communication wires for the trenches when a shell exploded. He was not found.

I have been working on a series of quilts about the impact of both wars on my family.

This quilt is part of that series.

I have used strip piecing as the technique which allowed me to immerse him into the landscape of that day. I have used the idiosyncrasies of the piecing technique to mimic the stratified layers that you find in roadside cuttings.


The chaos of the piecing has added to the dynamic of the subject.

I will attach a photo of ‘Harry’ which belongs to the North Melbourne Library and is posted on Trove, the National Library site. They very kindly allowed me to use the photo to get myself started on this work.



I hope this is useful to you.

Regards to yourself and Elwyn


Louise Falk


ANZAC DAY 2015


From Rosebud ...

... to Hyde Park

Well we were certainly busy in the medal room at Recherche's SERVICE MEDALS MELBOURNE - check out the posts as we steadily made our way through the promises.

30th March
New orders always welcomed, but we can no longer guarantee completion of
medal mounting before ANZAC DAY 2015 - watch for updates here ...

3rd April
Hoping we'll be able to take on new orders for completion before ANZAC Day
but we're still not promising yet.

7th April
We regret we are currently unable to promise finishing any new medal mounting orders
for before ANZAC Day. Next UPDATE April 14

17thApril
Last week before ANZAC DAY
To enquire if we can assist you before ANZAC Day please call (03) 9486 1236
or email your request to frame@recherche.alphalink.com.au
Pick up from Northcote only.


So many people so very keen to wear their medals or wear those of their family member in the many marches held around the world. 

Quite a privilege to be a little involved in their stories and so great to see the result of our labours being worn on the day.

Thank you for the photographs and the stories from the day,
appreciated very much.


Rochester Show 2015 backs Centenary WWI

An enthusiatic committee of the Victorian Agricultural Show at Rochester, this year featured the ANZAC Centenary.


New classes in both cookery and art sections were introduced, each with a variety of age-related sections.


And all of us here at Service Medals Melbourne and Recherché of Northcote are very excited to congratulate Annette Waters on her variety of wins at the show this year.


Annette is one of 80 students leaving for Turkey on 20th April! 


We met Annette, and her mother and father, when they came to obtain replica medals awarded to her great grandfather Private Norman McKenzies Rolls who served with the AIF 5th Battalion


Annette is pictured with Frame-maker & Medal-mounter Neville Crawford- Photo Credit Claire Waters

But perhaps it is better to let her heartfelt "Spirit of the ANZAC Entry" tell the story -


SHOW SECTION was - "Spirit of the Anzac" - A small write up and picture about the ANZAC landing, or about a specific soldier." (Under 18 years). Annette's artwork won first prize, plus a blue ribbon sash for best art exhibit (under 18 years)



Annette recorded the following information on the back of the canvas:

COMMEMORATING THE ANZAC CENTENARY 2015

A Tribute to my Great-Grandpa - Norman McKenzie Rolls


Mixed media
Acrylic on canvas; sprayed with metallic ink and glimmer mist


Featuring
  • A portrait of my Great-Grandpa wearing his Australian Imperial Force uniform. This photograph was taken during the First World War - circa 1915. Digital scan; laser print coloured with Copic markers.

  • AIF First World War Nominal Roll - Page 89 shows my Great-Grandpa’s details (also for his brother - Josiah Rolls - who later lost his life at the Western Front, and is buried in Belgium). Source: Australian War Memorial.


Embellished with
Replica “Rising Sun” and “AIF Returned from Active Service” badges
“Australia” shoulder title
medal ribbon bar
cork, sea grass cord, jute, chipboard, vellum, silk webbing, canvas, copper, ribbon, beads


(By Annette Waters - February 2015)


And here's the "Blue Ribbon" version -


It will be on display whenever she has a speaking engagement after she returns home from Gallipoli. Meanwhile, it will be finding a very special place on the wall at home!

Congratulations once again Annette.

We look forward to hearing more about this incredibly exciting tour soon to take place.


PS  In the hotly contested section  "Anzac biscuits -four" (Boys or Girls 14-18 years), Annette won second prize! Congratulations once again!


Related links -





And our especial thanks go to Claire Waters for the fantastic photographs and the very informative and warm correspondence we are now having!  Lovely to feel a part of your story. Thank you so much Claire and Gavan and Annette.

 

I found my great uncle's photograph at Pozieres!!

My trip to the Western Front was planned for 2011.

In preparation for this trip I researched my great uncle’s records from the National Archives and the Australian War Memorial.  I knew my great uncle very well and spent a lot of time with him until his death aged 90 in 1972 when I was 16.  

At that stage I had no idea about his military history only that he served in the war and my interest only grew as I got older.  I found out that he was awarded the Military Medal and Mentioned in Despatches but no-one in our family knew where his medals were.

I went to Northern France and Belgium in 2011 and retraced my great uncle’s footsteps through the war diaries on the Australian War Memorial website.  I visited the Windmill site at Pozieres.  Located at the memorial site in a glass information box was a photo of four unidentified gunners with a rundown of what occurred during July-August 1916.

  I was stunned when I saw this photo as the gunner (2nd from right) looked the image of my great uncle.  He would have been 34 at the time the photo was taken and located in the area.    There were no known photos of my great uncle during the time he served in the army and the only picture I had of him was an old photo when he was aged 70.  I took a photo of the information box at the Pozieres site containing the photo and continued my trip.
 
When I returned home I set out to prove that this man in the photo was my great uncle.
 
After much investigation, and with the assistance from staff from the  Commonwealth War Graves/Memorials and the Australian War Memorial, the same photo was located on the AWM website in the photo collection.  It was identified as C00450 with the citation below.   I told my story to the AWM but they said they couldn’t change the citation under the photo acknowledging the name of my great uncle without actual proof.
 
Group portrait of four unidentified gunners with one of the battery of 8 inch (French) mortar guns that used to fire on the Pozieres windmill. (From the collection of 704 Driver Ernest Charles Barnes who served with the 1st Field Artillery Brigade, 21st Howitzer Brigade and 2nd Field Artillery Brigade.)
 
 Over the next six months I came across his war medals during a clean out of a relative’s house after they had passed away, the medals had been missing for around 40 years.  I already had my great uncle’s name tag, two rising suns from his uniform and return soldier’s badge which my father had in his possession.
 
I took the medals and other items along with the photo above (which I purchased on CD from the AWM) and the only photo I had of my great uncle in his 70s to Recherché Specialty Picture Framing in Northcote as I wanted to get the items in a display frame but I also really wanted to get photographic comparisons done to show that the gunner was indeed my great uncle.

  The folk at Recherché arranged for their specialist photographer Alan Lesheim to undertake a process of identification.

This is the good news we received
We were all so thrilled to have this outcome. My next goal was to get the citation under the photo on the AWM website changed to include my great uncle’s name.
 
I then contacted the AWM sending on the backup documentation around the photo identification process. and later received the following response:
  
After examining Driver Pidoto’s service record, official  war diaries and your family photograph of him in later years, the best we can say is that the man in AWM photograph is possibly him.  I think I’ve explained the stringent requirements we require before we  add an identification to an AWM group portrait. 

However  in this case we have decided to modify the caption so that it will read:

  "Group portrait of four Australian artillery men with one of the battery of 8 inch (French) mortar guns that used to fire on the Pozieres windmill. (From the collection of 704 Driver Ernest Charles Barnes who served with the 1st Field Artillery Brigade, 21st Howitzer Brigade and 2nd Field Artillery Brigade.) The smiling man, second from right, is possibly 10781 Driver (Dvr) John Pidoto MM, 6th Field Artillery Brigade. Dvr Pidoto was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in laying signal wire under enemy artillery fire near Ecoust, France in April 1917"

So after a long process I achieved my goal of having my great uncle identified in the photo at Pozieres memorial site and the citation under the photo (AWM C00450) on the Australian Memorial website changed.   I only hope that the other three gunners can be identified in the not too distant future.
 
FOOTNOTE FROM THE FRAMER
Identifying World War I photographs for framing

All our work is interesting but this job was particularly engaging! Our customer Anne discovered at the Windmill site in Pozieres, a photograph that she believed was an image of her relative operating a trench mortar on the Western Front during World War I. To compare the photograph of the soldier with the image of this gent as an older man, we explored a variety of facial recognition techniques. Finally however, with the assistance of our photographic restorer and his "old school skills", it was indeed  possible to verify this identification! We have now been able to combine this eloquent image from the Western Front in a framed display together with the soldier's original medals and badges. Another very happy customer and what a story this has turned out to be.


Presenting War Service Memories

The Centenary of WW1 has awakened our memories and emotions of the past.

The participants often chose to try and forget their experiences, and, if they spoke about it, it was only to those who had gone through the same horrors.

Their descendants are trying to preserve and understand what remains of their sacrifice.

Some examples and stories we have been involved with include -

  • A 'lost' postcard sent to a soldier, who before his mail arrived to him, was badly wounded at the Battle of Fromelles. The 'undelivered' postcard was found in the mud of the Somme by another soldier and by this great good fortune it eventually reached the addressee.

  • The 303 clip of bullets worn on a bandolier that stopped a Boer bullet in the South African war.

  • The English-French dictionary that stopped a piece of shrapnel.

  • A woman who saw a familiar face in a photograph on display while touring the Western Front who later became able to identify one of the un-named soldiers as her Great Uncle.

It is not unusual at our design counter for there to be tears while discussing the presentation of these very personal items that mean so much to their owners.

As a picture framer it is essential to have or to access both correct preservation and presentation procedures, as well as understanding the nature of the contents intended  for display.


Indigenous servicemen honoured in 2014 Sydney Festival

BLACK DIGGERS

"To mark the eve of the centenary of the First World War, Sydney Festival presents a work of significance, scope and monumental ambition, in a world premiere event at Sydney Opera House.

Directed by Wesley Enoch and written by Tom Wright, Black Diggers uncovers the contribution of First World War Aboriginal Diggers, following their exceptional stories from their homelands to the battlefields of Gallipoli, Palestine and Flanders.

An all-male, all-Indigenous cast will evoke these heroic men, largely unknown to history."


You need Flash Player in order to view this.
Festival Thinking: Black Diggers
http://sydneyfestival.org.au/diggers To mark the eve of the centenary of the First World War, Sydney Festival presents a work of significance, scope and monumental ambition, in a world premiere e...



Theatre unearths Australia's shame

We need theatre where history fails: 'Black Diggers' shows Australians as the lesser Anzacs
by
Deborah Stone




Back History - ANZAC DAY 2013 - A Public Acknowledgement

Source Credit NITV News
First published April 25, 2013 and updated on Aug 26, 2013

Indigenous soldiers have been remembered in a ceremony in Canberra and in the streets of Sydney's inner suburb of Redfern, amid calls to better recognise Aboriginal diggers' contributions.
By NITV News 

"Amongst non-Indigenous Australians, the service and sacrifice of Torres Strait Islanders and Aboriginal men is very much unknown", said Gareth O' Connell from the ATSI Veterans and Services Association at a ceremony in Canberra.

Indigenous Australia's contribution to the nation's security has been present at every conflict from the colonial forces through to the current operations in the Middle East.

In his address to the Canberra gathering, Gary Oakley from the Australian War Memorial called for a greater recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander contributions.

"This country owes the Torres Strait Islanders a great debt. Out of all the places in Australia, during WWII, the Torres Strait Islanders put the most volunteers to the service. Over 95 per cent of the male population was in uniform. That is phenomenal".